If you already use Skype to stay in touch with friends and family in your life away from work, you’ll appreciate the power and simplicity of Skype for Business where it’s easy to find and connect with co-workers. And you can use the devices you already have to reach businesses through an enterprise-grade, secure, IT-managed platform. If you’re coming to Skype for Business from Lync, you’ll recognize all of the features you already use but in a fresh new interface with simplified controls and some great new additions:

  • New look and feel

  • Call from Skype for Business using your desk phone for audio

  • Integration with the Skype directory

  • Call Monitor

  • Rate My Call

  • Quick access to call controls

  • Emoticons

New look and feel

If you’re a regular user of the commercial version of Skype, then Skype for Business will seem very familiar: the Contacts list, presence indicators, buttons and icons, and even the app sounds should make you feel right at home. Learn more.

Skype for Business Contacts list

Of course, all the essential Lync features are still there—like the Quick Actions buttons, which let you IM or call a contact (and more) with just one click or tap.

Contact quick actions: IM, audio, video, contact card, and more

In the Skype Meeting window, the simplified arrangement of controls and menus makes it easy to find the command you need. In the conversation window, chat text is formatted so you can easily see who’s talking, and tabbed conversations allow you to keep track of several discussions at once.

IM window with two conversations, and meeting window with Present menu

If you’ve ever had someone send you a file during an IM conversation, then file transfer preview is another feature of the new Skype for Business look and feel you’ll appreciate. When someone sends you a file, select Download in the IM window to update the file’s icon, or right-click or tap and hold to forward, preview, or delete it.

Preview a file sent to you during an IM conversation

Call from Skype for Business using your desk phone for audio

Important   This feature is available only if your organization has Skype for Business Server 2015.

If you have a PBX (Private Branch Exchange) desk phone and your IT department has configured it to work with Skype for Business you can search for people in your organization and place calls to them from within the Skype for Business user interface, while audio for the call flows through your standard desk (PBX) phone. You can also place calls from the Skype for Business client using any phone near you (like your mobile, home, or hotel phone). The person you’re calling sees your phone number as though you were calling from your company’s main phone number. When you make a Skype for Business call with audio routed through your desk phone, you get great audio, plus:

  • IM—so you can do a quick copy/paste of a URL you want to share, for example

  • Desktop and app sharing—so you can easily show and tell, work through problems, or explain stuff with visuals

  • Attachments—send files to the other person without leaving Skype for Business

Diagram of the call via work process

Server admins enable and configure this feature for the enterprise. End users have limited configuration capabilities, which include turning the feature on or off for their individual account (once it’s enabled at the enterprise level) and setting the phone number that Skype for Business should call. If the number has been set and locked by the administrator, then outgoing call options will be unavailable.

Screen shot of the Call Handling dialog with the Outgoing Calls section highlighted

For more information, see Make a Skype for Business call but use your PBX desk phone for audio

Integration with the Skype directory

Important   This feature requires:

  • Skype for Business Server 2015 or Skype for Business for Office 365 Skype for Business Logo

  • The latest version of Skype Skype logo

Skype for Business users can connect over the Internet with hundreds of millions of Skype users right from the Skype for Business user interface. The first step is to search for your contact.

  1. In the search box on the Contacts view of the Skype for Business main window, type a name, IM address, or desk phone number (if they are in your organization). As you type, search results will start appearing below the search box and the tabs will change from Groups, Status, Relationships, and New:

    When the Search box is empty, the available tabs are Groups, Status, Relationships, and New.

    to My Contacts and Skype Directory:

    When you start typing in the Search box, the tabs below change to My Contacts and Skype Directory.

  2. If the person you are searching for is in your organization, keep the My Contacts tab selected (that’s the default). When My Contacts is selected, Skype for Business searches in your organization’s address book.

    If the person you are searching for is not in your organization but you know they have a Skype account, click the Skype Directory tab to search for them among the millions of Skype users out there. Knowing their Skype ID and location helps narrow the search quickly. You can also search using their email address or Microsoft account (e.g., JohnDoe@outlook.com).

    Note   Your administrator enables or disables the Skype Directory search feature in accordance with your organization’s search policy. If you don’t see a Skype Directory tab like the one shown in the screen shot above, then you won’t be able to search for Skype users.

When you search for contacts in the Skype directory, you can add them to your contact list, have an instant messaging conversation, see their presence information, and have an audio or video call with them. Note that the Skype directory only contains contact information for Skype users, not Skype for Business users. A Skype user who wants to add a Skype for Business user to their contact list must use the Skype for Business user’s full email address, such as Joe@contoso.com.

Call Monitor

Call Monitor is a popular Skype feature that’s now available in Skype for Business. With Call Monitor, you can move back and forth between a full Skype for Business window, for those times when you’re actively participating in the call, and a compact version that lets you continue to monitor call progress—and mute or end the call—while focusing on other tasks.

The compact Call Monitor window appears during an audio or video call whenever the main conversation window is minimized. To show the full conversation window again, simply double-click or double-tap the Call Monitor.

Screen shots of both full Skype for Business windows and minimized window

Rate My Call

The Rate My Call feature lets Skype for Business Server 2015 administrators collect call data, access standard reports, and export raw data for further analysis. This feature is available for on-premises deployments only. Users are prompted to take a survey after completing a call.

Screen shot of the call quality rating dialog

Quick access to call controls

Access to the dial pad and call controls is much improved. For public switched telephone network (PSTN) calls, the dial-pad and call controls remain visible throughout the call. For non-PSTN calls, the dial-pad and call controls are accessible with one click.

Comparison of call controls in PTSN and non-PTSN calls

Emoticons

Skype for Business now includes the same set of emoticons found in the consumer version of Skype. You can turn off emoticons in Skype for Business by going to Options > IM. No server setting is available.

Screen shot showing available emoticons and the control for turning them on and off

Related topics

Source: https://support.office.com/en-us/article/Lync-is-now-Skype-for-Business-%e2%80%94-see-whats-new-aba02d7e-c801-4a82-bccd-e7207240f612?ui=en-US&rs=en-US&ad=US

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Meet Exchange Server 2016


Meet Exchange Server 2016

Get a first look at Exchange Server 2016, the on-premises release that we plan to ship in the second half of this year. Come learn about the innovation in Exchange Server 2016 that will help you keep up with evolving requirements for user productivity and information protection. This session will give you the starting point who want to know what’s coming from on-premises Exchange.

Meet Exchange Server 2016
http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/Ignite/2015/FND2204

How to create Transport Rules in Exchange Online and Outlook Rules and the difference


Using Transport rules, you can look for specific conditions in messages that pass through your organization and take action on them. Transport rules let you apply messaging policies to email messages, secure messages, protect messaging systems, and prevent information leakage.

Many organizations today are required by law, regulatory requirements, or company policies to apply messaging policies that limit the interaction between recipients and senders, both inside and outside the organization. In addition to limiting interactions among individuals, departmental groups inside the organization, and entities outside the organization, some organizations are also subject to the following messaging policy requirements:

  • Preventing inappropriate content from entering or leaving the organization

  • Filtering confidential organization information

  • Tracking or archiving copying messages that are sent to or received from specific individuals

  • Redirecting inbound and outbound messages for inspection before delivery

  • Applying disclaimers to messages as they pass through the organization

Overview of Transport rules
Transport rules are similar to the Inbox rules that are available in many email clients. The main difference between Transport rules and rules you would set up in a client application such as Outlook is that Transport rules take action on messages while they’re in transit as opposed to after the message is delivered. Transport rules also contain a richer set of conditions, exceptions, and actions, which provides you with the flexibility to create a customized rule. You can create up to 100 Transport rules in order to implement your business-rule compliance.

The following list summarizes the basic workflow for Transport rules:

  1. You create Transport rules to meet your business needs.

  2. As messages go through your organization, the Transport rules agent is invoked. The Transport rules agent is a special component that checks messages against the Transport rules you create.

  3. The Transport rules agent scans the message, and if the message fits the conditions you specify in a Transport rule, it takes the specified action on that message.

Transport rule components

Transport rules consist of the following components:

  • Conditions   Use Transport rule conditions to specify the characteristics of messages to which you want to apply a Transport rule action. Conditions consist of one or more predicates that specify the parts of a message that should be examined. Some predicates examine message fields or headers, such as the To, From, or Cc fields. Other predicates examine message characteristics such as message subject, body, attachments, message size, and message classification. Most predicates require that you specify a comparison operator, such as equals, doesn’t equal, or contains, and a value to match.

  • Exceptions Exceptions are based on the same predicates used to build Transport rule conditions. However, unlike conditions, exceptions identify messages to which Transport rule actions shouldn’t be applied. Exceptions override conditions and prevent actions from being applied to an email message, even if the message matches all configured conditions.

  • Actions Actions are applied to messages that match the conditions and don’t match any exceptions defined in the Transport rule. Transport rules have many actions available, such as rejecting, deleting, or redirecting messages, adding additional recipients, adding prefixes in the message subject, or inserting disclaimers in the message body.

For a complete list of Transport rule predicates, see Transport Rule Predicates. The list of predicates is also available in the Transport rule dialog in the EAC. If you use the Shell, you can retrieve the list of predicates by using the Get-TransportRulePredicate cmdlet.

For a complete list of Transport rule actions available, see Transport Rule Actions. The list of actions is also available in the Transport rule dialog box in the EAC. If you use the Shell, you can retrieve the list of actions by using the Get-TransportRuleAction cmdlet.

To create Transport Rules in Office 365, first must log into Office 365portal https://portal.microsoftonline.com/default.aspx and go to the following location:

  1. Go to Admin and choose Exchange

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2.  Navigate to Mail Flow (from the left site) and choose Rules

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This is where any and all transport rules can be created and applied

Once you are in the rules area of the O365 portal, you perform the following:

1. Press the + sign and then select Create a new rule

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2. Choose a name for this rule and choose the rule for your condition (depends what you want to achieve)
3. Choose the option that apply for your condition and after you finished click on Save

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4. Now, this rule is ready to be applied to all emails coming through your Office 365 tenant.

For comprehensive information on Transport Rules as a whole, refer to the following link: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd351127(v=exchg.150).aspx

Outlook Rules
A rule is an action that Microsoft Outlook runs automatically on incoming or outgoing messages, based on conditions that you have specified.

Rules help reduce manually filing or taking the same action when a similar message arrives. Unlike Quick Steps, rules typically are always on and run automatically. For example, when a message is received from a specified person, it’s automatically moved to the folder that you designate.

The Rules Wizard helps you design rules to manage messages. Rules fall into one of two categories — organization and notification.

ZA104018600

The Rules Wizard includes templates for the most frequently used rules, which include the following:

Stay Organized    These rules help you file and follow up on messages. For example, you can create a rule for messages from a specific sender, such as Anne Weiler, with the word “sales” in the Subject line, to be flagged for follow-up, categorized as Sales, and moved to a folder named Anne’s Sales.

Stay Up to Date    These rules notify you in some way when you receive a particular message. For example, you can create a rule that automatically sends a message to a mobile device when you receive a message from a family member.

Start from a blank rule    These are rules that you create without the aid of a rule template and that you can completely customize.

Create a rule

Outlook includes rule templates for common scenarios. Use these rule templates, or create design your own custom rules.

1. Click the File tab, click Manage Rules & Alerts

Image_4

2. In the Rules and Alerts dialog box, on the E-mail Rules tab, click New Rule
3. Follow the wizard and at the end click Finish

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Additional Information:
Manage email messages by using rules
http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/outlook-help/manage-email-messages-by-using-rules-HA102749402.aspx

Office 365 User Creation and License assignment


Today, I manage to complete the bellow script, in order some basic Office 365 User Creation and License assignment to be automate with one click

This script automate execute steps for Office 365 Administrator Tasks.
By choosing only a number, you can manage your Office 365 Tasks.

What do you need to know before you begin?

  • Make sure you have already installed Windows Azure AD PowerShell
  • You must check and be sure your server or your computer has access to the internet

Let’s have a quick look how to execute the script O365Tool_v1.0 on Windows PowerShell and what this script do for us.

  1. Login to your computer with Administrator credentials
  2. Start Windows Azure AD PowerShell “As Administrator”

clip_image001[4]

  1. Next step, copy the script O365Tool_v1.0 on (C:\O365Tool_v1.0) folder or create the O365Tool_v1.0 folder in your preferred destination

clip_image002[4]

  1. Let’s start by running the script from Windows Azure AD PowerShell itself.
    In case you get weird error messages when you try to run a script, the reason is only one, security settings built into Windows PowerShell include something called the “execution policy” the execution policy determines how (or if) PowerShell runs scripts. By default, PowerShell’s execution policy is set to Restricted that means that scripts – including those you write yourself – won’t run.
    Navigate back to Windows PowerShell and set the Execution policy to unrestricted in order to be able to run the script, in that case, use this command to set your execution policy to RemoteSigned or Unrestricted

clip_image003[4]

Note: The Set-ExecutionPolicy cmdlet enables you to determine which Windows PowerShell scripts (if any) will be allowed to run on your computer.

Windows PowerShell has four different execution policies:

  • Restricted – No scripts can be run. Windows PowerShell can be used only in interactive mode.
  • AllSigned – Only scripts signed by a trusted publisher can be run.
  • RemoteSigned – Downloaded scripts must be signed by a trusted publisher before they can be run.
  • Unrestricted – No restrictions; all Windows PowerShell scripts can be run.
  1. The most common (default) way to run a script is by calling it:

PS C:\> & “C:\Admin\My first Script.ps1”

If the path does not contain any spaces, then you can omit the quotes and the ‘&’ operator

PS C:\> C:\Admin\Myscript.ps1

If the script is in the current directory, you must indicate this using .\ (or ./ will also work)

PS C:\> .\Myscript.ps1

Create the folders:

Main folder: O365Tool

Subfolder’s: Logs and Exports

clip_image004[4]

In our case scenario we run the script in the current directory “C:\O365Tool_v1.0” so, we must indicate this using .\ and we click Enter

clip_image005[5]

  1. Prepare the CSV file ” the file is included on the script zip”

clip_image006[5]

  1. Type your Global Admin credentials, Username and Password in order to login

clip_image007[5]

  1. Our script now it starts running, select an option from the menu. In my case scenario, I will select option 1, to start the creation of the new users and then to proceed with the rest of the options.

clip_image008[6]

Users are now created:

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Option 2, Set UsageLocation:

clip_image010[4]

Option 3, as I have only EnterprisePack:

clip_image011[5]

Option 5, Export Mailboxes from Office 365:

clip_image012[4]

Option 6: The script has a timer for how long the script is execute:

clip_image013[4]

Enjoy…

Download the Script here: https://gallery.technet.microsoft.com/Office-365-User-Creation-b8e48121

Office 365 Message Encryption


 

Deliver confidential business communications with enhanced security, allowing users to send and receive encrypted email as easily as regular email directly from their desktops. Customize the email viewing portal to enhance your organization’s brand. Email can be encrypted without complex hardware and software to purchase, configure, or maintain, which helps to minimize capital investment, free up IT resources, and mitigate messaging risks.

Scripts:ExportO365UserList_v2.0 and Import_UserList_For_Archive_Mailbox


    Today, I manage to complete the bellow script, in order to automate exporting user list from Office 365 and also with a second script to enable mailbox archive for specific users

    Let’s take a closer look and see how it works

    What do you need to know before you begin?

    • Make sure you have already installed Windows Azure AD PowerShell
    • You must check and be sure your server or your computer has access to the internet

    Let’s have a quick look how to execute the script ExportO365UserList_v2.0 and Import_UserList_For_Archive_Mailbox.ps1 on Windows PowerShell and what this script do for us.

    1. Login to your computer with Administrator credentials
    2. Start Windows Azure AD PowerShell “As Administrator”

    clip_image001

3. Next step, copy the scripts ExportO365UserList_v2.0 and Import_UserList_For_Archive_Mailbox.ps1 on (C:\) drive

    clip_image002

4. Let’s start by running the script from Windows Azure AD PowerShell itself.
In case you get weird error messages when you try to run a script, the reason is only one, security settings built into Windows PowerShell include something called the “execution policy” the execution policy determines how (or if) PowerShell runs scripts. By default, PowerShell’s execution policy is set to Restricted that means that scripts – including those you write yourself – won’t run.
Navigate back to Windows PowerShell and set the Execution policy to unrestricted in order to be able to run the script, in that case, use this command to set your execution policy to RemoteSigned or Unrestricted

    clip_image003

    Note: The Set-ExecutionPolicy cmdlet enables you to determine which Windows PowerShell scripts (if any) will be allowed to run on your computer.

    Windows PowerShell has four different execution policies:

    • Restricted – No scripts can be run. Windows PowerShell can be used only in interactive mode.
    • AllSigned – Only scripts signed by a trusted publisher can be run.
    • RemoteSigned – Downloaded scripts must be signed by a trusted publisher before they can be run.
    • Unrestricted – No restrictions; all Windows PowerShell scripts can be run.
    1. The most common (default) way to run a script is by calling it:

    PS C:\> & “C:\Admin\My first Script.ps1”

    If the path does not contain any spaces, then you can omit the quotes and the ‘&’ operator

    PS C:\> C:\Admin\Myscript.ps1

    If the script is in the current directory, you must indicate this using .\ (or ./ will also work)

    PS C:\> .\Myscript.ps1

    In our case scenario we run the script in the current directory “C:\” so, we must indicate this using .\ and we click Enter

    clip_image004

5. Type your Global Admin credentials, Username and Password in order to login and the script automatically will export the Office 365 User List on C:\

    clip_image005

6. Go to C:\ drive and check the list which is exported there, with the name O365UserList.csv

    clip_image006

7. Next step, is to open the exported list with the excel file, on the list we can see all licensed users, SMTP addresses and display name

    clip_image007

    Now we will filter this list and we’ll select only the users that we want to enable mailbox archive

    clip_image008

8. I will copy on notepad only the SMTP addresses (UserPrincipalName) and paste them on the notepad as follow

    Note: on the top of the file type Identity

    clip_image009

    Save the file on C:\ drive as UserListForMailboxArchive.csv

9. Navigate to Windows Azure Active Directory Module for Windows PowerShell and run the Import_UserList_For_Archive_Mailbox.ps1 script

    clip_image010

    As we can see Mailbox Archive was enabled for those users

    clip_image011

    You can download the scripts from TechNet Gallery, click here 

Script: Exchange Server 2013 SP1 Prerequisites (Exchange2013SP1Prerequisites_W2008R2SP1_v1.0)


This script automate execute steps for installing the necessary Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1 operating system prerequisites for the Microsoft Exchange 2013 Mailbox, Client Access, Multirole and Edge Transport server roles. The prerequisites that are needed to install Exchange 2013 on a Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1 computer depends on which Exchange roles you want to install.

What do you need to know before you begin?

  • The Edge Transport server role is available starting with Exchange 2013 SP1.
  • Make sure that the functional level of your forest is at least Windows Server 2003, and that the schema master is running Windows Server 2003 with Service Pack 2 or later.
  • The full installation option of Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1 must be used for all servers running Exchange 2013 server roles or management tools.
  • You must first join the computer to the appropriate internal Active Directory forest and domain.
  • You must check and be sure your server has access to the internet
  • Some prerequisites require you to reboot the server to complete installation.

Let’s have a quick look how to execute the script Exchange2013SP1Prerequisites_W2008R2SP1_v1.0 on Windows PowerShell and what this script do for us.

  1. Login to Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1 with Enterprise Administrator credentials
  2. Start Windows PowerShell “As Administrator”

clip_image001

  1. Next step, copy the script Exchange2013SP1Prerequisites_W2008R2SP1_v1.0 on (C:\) drive
  1. Let’s start with running scripts from within Windows PowerShell itself.
    In case you get weird error messages when you try to run a script, the reason is only one, security settings built into Windows PowerShell include something called the “execution policy” the execution policy determines how (or if) PowerShell runs scripts. By default, PowerShell’s execution policy is set to Restricted that means that scripts – including those you write yourself – won’t run.
    Navigate back to Windows PowerShell and set the Execution policy to unrestricted in order to be able to run the script, in that case, use this command to set your execution policy to RemoteSigned or Unrestricted

clip_image002

Note: The Set-ExecutionPolicy cmdlet enables you to determine which Windows PowerShell scripts (if any) will be allowed to run on your computer.

Windows PowerShell has four different execution policies:

  • Restricted – No scripts can be run. Windows PowerShell can be used only in interactive mode.
  • AllSigned – Only scripts signed by a trusted publisher can be run.
  • RemoteSigned – Downloaded scripts must be signed by a trusted publisher before they can be run.
  • Unrestricted – No restrictions; all Windows PowerShell scripts can be run.
  1. The most common (default) way to run a script is by calling it:

PS C:\> & “C:\Admin\My first Script.ps1”

If the path does not contain any spaces, then you can omit the quotes and the ‘&’ operator

PS C:\> C:\Admin\Myscript.ps1

If the script is in the current directory, you must indicate this using .\ (or ./ will also work)

PS C:\> .\Myscript.ps1

In our case scenario we run the script in the current directory “C:\” so, we must indicate this using .\ and we click Enter

clip_image003

  1. Our script now it starts running, select an option from the menu. In my case scenario, I will select option 3 (E2013 Multirole installation) and click Enter

clip_image004

  1. As you can easy check bellow, my Multirole Prerequisites are in progress to be download and install

clip_image005

  1. After the Prerequisites successfully installed, we have to choose the option 10 in order to restart our server

clip_image006

  1. After restart your server, login as EA and proceed to install your Microsoft Exchange Server 2013 SP1

clip_image007

You can download the script from TechNet Gallery Script Center Capture

Exchange Server 2013 SP1 Prerequisites (Exchange2013SP1Prerequisites_v1.0)


Exchange Server 2013 SP1 Prerequisites (Exchange2013SP1Prerequisites_v1.0)

This script automate execute steps for installing the necessary Windows Server 2012 R2 and Windows Server 2012 operating system prerequisites for the Microsoft Exchange 2013 Mailbox, Client Access, Multirole and Edge Transport server roles. The prerequisites that are needed to install Exchange 2013 on a Windows Server 2012 R2 or Windows Server 2012 computer depends on which Exchange roles you want to install.

What do you need to know before you begin?

o The Edge Transport server role is available starting with Exchange 2013 SP1.

o Make sure that the functional level of your forest is at least Windows Server 2003, and that the schema master is running Windows Server 2003 with Service Pack 2 or later.

o The full installation option of Windows Server 2012 R2 and Windows Server 2012 must be used for all servers running Exchange 2013 server roles or management tools.

o You must first join the computer to the appropriate internal Active Directory forest and domain.

o You must check and be sure your server has access to the internet

o Some prerequisites require you to reboot the server to complete installation.

Let’s have a quick look how to execute the script Exchange2013SP1Prerequisites_v1.0 on Windows PowerShell and what this script do for us.

1. Login to Windows Server 2012 R2 and Windows Server 2012 with Enterprise Administrator credentials

2. Start Windows PowerShell “As Administrator”

clip_image002

3. Next step, copy the script Exchange2013SP1Prerequisites_v1.0 on (C:\) drive

clip_image004

4. Let’s start with running scripts from within Windows PowerShell itself.
In case you get weird error messages when you try to run a script, the reason is only one, security settings built into Windows PowerShell include something called the “execution policy” the execution policy determines how (or if) PowerShell runs scripts. By default, PowerShell’s execution policy is set to Restricted that means that scripts – including those you write yourself – won’t run.
Navigate back to Windows PowerShell and set the Execution policy to unrestricted in order to be able to run the script, in that case, use this command to set your execution policy to RemoteSigned or Unrestricted

clip_image006

Note: The Set-ExecutionPolicy cmdlet enables you to determine which Windows PowerShell scripts (if any) will be allowed to run on your computer.

Windows PowerShell has four different execution policies:

o Restricted – No scripts can be run. Windows PowerShell can be used only in interactive mode.

o AllSigned – Only scripts signed by a trusted publisher can be run.

o RemoteSigned – Downloaded scripts must be signed by a trusted publisher before they can be run.

o Unrestricted – No restrictions; all Windows PowerShell scripts can be run.

5. The most common (default) way to run a script is by calling it:

PS C:\> & “C:\Admin\My first Script.ps1”

If the path does not contain any spaces, then you can omit the quotes and the ‘&’ operator

PS C:\> C:\Admin\Myscript.ps1

If the script is in the current directory, you must indicate this using .\ (or ./ will also work)

PS C:\> .\Myscript.ps1

In our case scenario we run the script in the current directory “C:\” so, we must indicate this using .\ and we click Enter

clip_image008

6. Our script now it starts running, select an option from the menu. In my case scenario, I will select option 3 (E2013 Multirole installation) and click Enter

clip_image010

7. As you can easy check bellow, my Multirole Prerequisites are in progress to be download and install

clip_image012

8.  After the Prerequisites successfully installed, we have to choose the option 10 in order to restart our server

clip_image014

9. After restart your server, login as EA and proceed to install your Microsoft Exchange Server 2013 SP1

clip_image016

You can download the script here

Enjoy…..Winking smile

Script to automate connect and disconnect from Office 365


This script automate execute steps for connecting to Office 365.
By choosing only a number, you can manage your Office 365 connection or disconnect

what-you-need-to-know

 

What do you need to know before you begin?

  • Make sure you have already installed Windows Azure AD PowerShell
  • You must check and be sure your server or your computer has access to the internet

Let’s have a quick look how to execute the script Connect_to_EXO_v1.0 on Windows PowerShell and what this script do for us.

  1. Login to your computer with Administrator credentials
  2. Start Windows Azure AD PowerShell “As Administrator”

clip_image001

3. Next step, copy the script Connect_to_EXO_v1.0 on (C:\) drive

clip_image002

4. Let’s start by running the script from Windows Azure AD PowerShell itself.
In case you get weird error messages when you try to run a script, the reason is only one, security settings built into Windows PowerShell include something called the “execution policy” the execution policy determines how (or if) PowerShell runs scripts. By default, PowerShell’s execution policy is set to Restricted that means that scripts – including those you write yourself – won’t run.
Navigate back to Windows PowerShell and set the Execution policy to unrestricted in order to be able to run the script, in that case, use this command to set your execution policy to RemoteSigned or Unrestricted

clip_image003

Note: The Set-ExecutionPolicy cmdlet enables you to determine which Windows PowerShell scripts (if any) will be allowed to run on your computer.

Windows PowerShell has four different execution policies:

  • Restricted – No scripts can be run. Windows PowerShell can be used only in interactive mode.
  • AllSigned – Only scripts signed by a trusted publisher can be run.
  • RemoteSigned – Downloaded scripts must be signed by a trusted publisher before they can be run.
  • Unrestricted – No restrictions; all Windows PowerShell scripts can be run.

5. The most common (default) way to run a script is by calling it:

PS C:\> & “C:\Admin\My first Script.ps1”

If the path does not contain any spaces, then you can omit the quotes and the ‘&’ operator

PS C:\> C:\Admin\Myscript.ps1

If the script is in the current directory, you must indicate this using .\ (or ./ will also work)

PS C:\> .\Myscript.ps1

In our case scenario we run the script in the current directory “C:\” so, we must indicate this using .\ and we click Enter

clip_image004

6. Our script now it starts running, select an option from the menu. In my case scenario, I will select option 1 (Connect to Exchange Online) and click Enter

clip_image005

7. Type your credentials (Username and Password) and let the script do the rest for you…

clip_image006

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You can download the script, from here Microsoft TechNet Gallery

Enjoy…..Winking smile

Office 365 "W15" Hybrid Deployment (Part VI) – Configuring a Microsoft Exchange Online Hybrid Deployment


After having in Part 5 configure part of Microsoft Exchange Server, in Part 6 and final part we will continue with Exchange Server configuration based migrations to Office 365 or more precisely Exchange Online, we ran the Exchange 2010 SP3 hybrid configuration wizard in order to set up the basic Exchange hybrid configuration.

Let’s go.…

Look at Current Hybrid Configuration

Let’s take a look at the stuff that was created behind the scene, when we ran the Hybrid Configuration Wizard (HCW).
Let’s first look at the hybrid configuration object itself. We can do so by launching the Exchange Management Shell (EMS), and run the following command: Get-HybridConfiguration

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As you can see above, the settings (such as hybrid Client Access and Hub transport server, on premise smart host and federation domains) you specified when we ran the wizard have been set on the hybrid configuration object. But, this is not the only thing that have been configured. You can also see which features have been enabled (FreeBusy, MoveMailbox, MailTips, MessageTracking, OwaRedirection, OnlineArchive, SecureMail and CentralizedTransport), which are features we wish to enable between the on premise Exchange organization and the Exchange Online organization in Office 365.
In addition, the following has also been performed in the on premise Exchange organization:
A federation trust with the Microsoft Federation Gateway (MFG) has been established for the specified domain:

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Creating a federation trust with the MFG is required in order to be able to set up an organizational relationship, which again is required in order to share free/busy information and calendars between the on premise Exchange organization and the Exchange Online organization in Office 365. With this said, it’s important to note that a trust isn’t set up with the MFG, instead the MFG merely acts as a trust broker between the involved Exchange organizations.

“tenant_name.mail.onmicrosoft.com” has been added as an accepted domain:

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Adding the “tenant_name.mail.onmicrosoft.com” domain to the “Accepted Domains” list as an authoritative domain is required in order for the on premise Exchange organization to accept inbound e-mail messages destined for a mailbox user located in Exchange Online. When a mailbox is moved from the on premise Exchange organization to Exchange Online, the source mailbox user object is converted to a mail user object, which is configured with an external address of “alias@office365labdk.onmicrosoft.com“. We will look more at this later in this article series.

“tenant_name.mail.onmicrosoft.com” and “onprem.local” has been added as a remote domain:

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A remote domain is an SMTP domain that is external to our Exchange organization. When a new remote domain is created, it’s possible to specify the remote domain is used for Exchange Online purposes. With a remote domain, we can configure out of office and message formatting settings. The HCW sets the ideal setting for a hybrid and enables the SMTP domain as the domain used for an Office 365 tenant, which is important in relation to provisioning of new remote mailbox users (users that get a mailbox created directly in Exchange Online).
The default E-Mail Address policy has been updated, so that it stamps a secondary proxy address (alias@tenant_name.mail.onmicrosoft.com) on mailbox user objects:

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The SMTP address “alias@lacosanostra365.mail.onmicrosoft.com“ is added to the default E-mail address policy, so that it can be stamped as an additional proxy address on the mail objects in the organization. As mentioned earlier, when a mailbox is moved to Exchange Online, the source mailbox user object is converted to a mail user object and in order to be able to set “alias@office365labdk.mail.onmicrosoft.com“ as the external e-mail address, it must already be stamped on the object. The HCW also creates a receive connector on each of the hybrid servers. The purpose of this receive connector is to accept inbound mail that comes directly from Exchange Online in Office 365. The receive connector accepts anonymous connections secured using TLS, but only from the IP range used by Office 365.
In addition, the HCW will create a send connector that will route all e-mail messages destined for “tenant_name.mail.onmicrosoft.com” to Exchange Online in Office 365.

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And finally, an organizational relationship has been established with the Exchange Online organization in Office 365:

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The organization relationship is used to configure what kind of features should be enabled between the on premise Exchange organization and Exchange Online and for availability sharing at what level.
Let’s take a closer look at the organization relationship that has been created. We can do this by running the following command in the Exchange Management Shell (EMS): Get-OrganizationRelationship | fl
By default, free/busy is enabled with limited details. In addition, mailbox moves, delivery reports, MailTips and online archive are enabled. Moreover, a target OWA URL is specified and by default, it will be set to: “http://outlook.com/owa/tenant_name.onmicrosoft.com”. The target OWA URL is the URL that a user will be non-transparently redirected to (we will look at this later in this article series), when he tries to access his mailbox using the existing OWA namespace (i.e. http://mail.domain.com/owa) after his mailbox has been moved to Exchange Online. Lastly, a target autodisocver has been set by the HCW.
This is the endpoint used to reach out to the Exchange Online organization for the configured features, when a request comes from the on premise Exchange organization to the Exchange Online organization.
In Office 365, the following was configured, when we ran the HCW
Just like for the on premise Exchange organization, the domains used for routing between on premise and Exchange Online has been added as “Accepted Domains” in the Exchange Online organization.

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Likewise, for remote domains, these have been configured in Exchange Online. An organization relationship has been configured in Exchange Online, so the sharing requests etc. from an Exchange Online mailbox user to an on premise mailbox user is sent to the on premise Exchange organization.

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Just like is the case with the on premise Exchange organization, we can get additional information about the configuration of the organization relationship by running the following command: Get-OrganizationRelationship | fl

Update Hybrid Configuration

If you at some point wish to update the hybrid configuration in your environment, you can do so via the HCW or EMS.
If you want to use the HCW, you simply click on the hybrid configuration object in the EMC, and select “Manage Hybrid Configuration” in the context menu.

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If you want to use EMS, you first set the required configuration using the Set-HybridConfiguration cmdlet and then you run the Update-HybridConfiguration cmdlet to push the new configuration to Office 365.
Read more about the Set-HybridConfiguration cmdlet here and the Update-HybridConfiguration cmdlet here.

That is we will move an on premise Exchange mailbox to Exchange Online and then we will test the browser and client behavior and see what to expect when a mailbox has been moved from on premise Exchange to Exchange Online. Moreover, we will be provisioning a new mailbox in Exchange Online using the “New Remote Mailbox” wizard and the “New-RemoteMailbox” cmdlet.
Lastly, I explain what to consider when it comes to decommissioning your Exchange on premise servers or just the legacy Exchange servers within your on premise environment.

Moving a Mailbox

Now that we have configured a hybrid deployment, let’s test things out to ensure they work as expected. First, we will move an on premise mailbox to Exchange Online using the “New Remote Move Request” wizard. This can be done by right-clicking on an on premise mailbox and selecting “New Remote Move Request” in the context menu as shown in

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On the “Introduction” page, click “Next”.

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On the “Connection Configurations” page, make sure “Target forest” is set to “the name you gave the additional Exchange forest”, then enter the FQDN for the Exchange hybrid server that has the Client Access server role installed. Also, enter the credentials for an on premise administrator and click “Next”.

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On the “Move Settings” page, click “Browse” and then select the target delivery domain (in this case “office365labdk.mail.onmicrosoft.com”). Since, we’re moving a mailbox to Exchange Online, we cannot select the target database (it will be picked randomly). Click “Next

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On the “Configuration Summary” page, click “New” in order to create the remote move request in Exchange Online.

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On the “Completion” page, click “Finish

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Let’s go and see how to migrate mailbox data by using the Exchange Admin Center in Office 365

1. Sign in to the Office 365 portal (https://portal.microsoftonline.com).

2. Click Admin, and then click Exchange.

3. Click Migration, click New (+), and then click Onboarding.

4. Select the migration option that you want, and then click Next. Migration options are as follows:

· Remote move

· Staged migration

· Cutover migration

· IMAP
The following screen shot shows the migration options:

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In New migration batch window, click New (+)

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Select the user/s that you want to move and click add and then ok and Next

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In the next window enter on premise account credentials and click Next

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After the wizard finish, the mailbox will be moved successful to Office 365

Enjoy…